Bring Out Your Dead

Last year, I ran a little itch.io jam called Bring Out Your Dead, for which people could submit unfinished projects and weird concept experiments. And I started doing some write-ups at the time of the pieces that caught my attention, but in some kind of meta keeping with the jam, I didn’t finish and publish […]

via A few more corpses from BOYD — Emily Short’s Interactive Storytelling

Absolutely love this ‘Bring Out Your Dead’ idea – to have a showing/airing of works that aren’t finished (and will possibly never be finished). Maybe it allows you to see what is worth hanging on to. Or lets you put it to rest. Or at least celebrate that you were trying something even if it was never going to work.

This was the overview from the event (which expresses the above so much more elegantly and precisely):

Bring Out Your Dead is an event for sharing dead WIPs and experiments that you don’t expect to finish, but that you’d like to show to someone anyway. It’s a chance to cleanse your hard drive, move on from old ideas, and salvage some learning from things that didn’t work out. It’s also an opportunity for your community to learn from your mistakes — which can be just as useful as learning from a success. Ambitious follies, bizarre experiments, toys, and notions that in retrospect never had a chance — all are welcome.

You are also welcome, and indeed encouraged, to provide some context about your work. What were you trying to achieve? What do you think is most or least successful about what you did? Why did you ultimately decide to abandon the project? Are there things you think others could learn from the project?

There is no ranking in this jam: it’s not about competition and judgments. However, discussion is welcome, especially if you find something in someone’s entry that sparks your imagination.

via https://itch.io/jam/bring-out-your-dead

This would work so well in the context of performance-making. I’m going to do it. I’m going to book a space for a day or weekend and put out the call. Emily Short, I hope you don’t mind? #watchthisspace

 

Story Shuffle

Keen to try this out but just realised, following move, am a bit more isolated in terms of other writing friends than I used to be. I took you for granted co-located writing buddies … I’m sorry….

On the other hand, maybe this is motivation to organise a day or weekend of writing events to make new writing friends…

“Story Shuffle: A Collaborative Writing Exercise

Participants in this exercise will use index cards to generate short prose fragments. Once collected together and shuffled, the fragments form a single work of collaborative fiction which, though no doubt peculiar in structure and varied in tone, will present surprising and exciting arrangements of setting, character, points of view, and plot.”

Source: Writing Resources | Jedediah Berry

The stage

‘Somehow we don’t feel the same way about someone on stage: Performers are usually rewarded for their bravery, applauded for making themselves vulnerable. Bloggers, on the other hand, are seemingly hobbyists and amateurs, even if they’re getting paid for their work.’

via The 80/20 Rule — Matter — Medium.

It’s an interesting suggestion, that many (most?) don’t see blogging as performance, or that, if they/we/I do that they/we/I have different criteria for what makes a good performance/performer.

(I’m not sure what’s going on with the they/we/I here … I’m uncomfortable with continuing the generalised ‘we’ of the quote I think. Who is this ‘we’?)

‘this is just where we keep the chairs’

‘Come in, come in and take a seat, but please don’t wait for the show to start.

It has already started.

You probably thought it would begin once an audience had assembled, we apologize for any confusion.

The show began before you arrived and it will continue after you leave.

(It may follow you like a puppy or a lingering dream.)

You don’t have to stay here, this is just where we keep the chairs and you can take your chair with you, if you are attached to it, or you may choose another.’

via flax-golden tales: take a seat | erin morgenstern.

Unbind and stitch

‘A writing and reading adventure in participatory fiction. Will you read and write the story with us?’

via Introducing Story Unbound — Story Unbound — Medium.

This is an interesting idea that I bookmarked a little while ago. The short story is that it’s a collaborative writing experiment using the Medium writing/publishing platform. It’s not something that I have the time or motivation to get involved with myself but I was intrigued to see how/where it was going.

Checking back in on it today I see there are a number of stories/beginnings that have been ‘unbound’ and put out there for others to ‘stitch’ into/onto.

Something I think is really neat is the way that ‘story maps’ are being created using Coggle. For example, a story map of ‘The Tests’ (as it stands today):

TheTestsCoggle