Bring Out Your Dead

Last year, I ran a little itch.io jam called Bring Out Your Dead, for which people could submit unfinished projects and weird concept experiments. And I started doing some write-ups at the time of the pieces that caught my attention, but in some kind of meta keeping with the jam, I didn’t finish and publish […]

via A few more corpses from BOYD — Emily Short’s Interactive Storytelling

Absolutely love this ‘Bring Out Your Dead’ idea – to have a showing/airing of works that aren’t finished (and will possibly never be finished). Maybe it allows you to see what is worth hanging on to. Or lets you put it to rest. Or at least celebrate that you were trying something even if it was never going to work.

This was the overview from the event (which expresses the above so much more elegantly and precisely):

Bring Out Your Dead is an event for sharing dead WIPs and experiments that you don’t expect to finish, but that you’d like to show to someone anyway. It’s a chance to cleanse your hard drive, move on from old ideas, and salvage some learning from things that didn’t work out. It’s also an opportunity for your community to learn from your mistakes — which can be just as useful as learning from a success. Ambitious follies, bizarre experiments, toys, and notions that in retrospect never had a chance — all are welcome.

You are also welcome, and indeed encouraged, to provide some context about your work. What were you trying to achieve? What do you think is most or least successful about what you did? Why did you ultimately decide to abandon the project? Are there things you think others could learn from the project?

There is no ranking in this jam: it’s not about competition and judgments. However, discussion is welcome, especially if you find something in someone’s entry that sparks your imagination.

via https://itch.io/jam/bring-out-your-dead

This would work so well in the context of performance-making. I’m going to do it. I’m going to book a space for a day or weekend and put out the call. Emily Short, I hope you don’t mind? #watchthisspace

 

For the diary

The Ghosts of Nothing
In Memory of Johnny B. Goode – World Tour of Abandoned Gaol-Houses 2016/2017
Featuring Laura Purcell at The Tench, Penitentiary Chapel Historic Site (Hobart, Tasmania, Australia).
Saturday 18 November 2017 6pm

Source: The Ghosts of Nothing: World Tour of Abandoned Gaol-Houses — Laura Purcell

(nice) surprises

Oh, drag me. Anytime.

‘I think I am an unequivocal fan of the theatre of surprise. An accidental adventure. The question is, is this a completely naive and brainless idea. Since when were you in the middle of your day really ‘emotionally open‘ enough to go on an adventure. And how much more effort will it take to try to drag someone out of work emails into a playful space.’

Source: Anagram | Losing it and the theatre of (nice) surprises

Necessarily incomplete

‘I’m beginning to suspect that the reason SNM is so successful may be less that the experience is immersive but the fact that it is complex, compelling, and difficult to understand or complete alone. With 17 hours of content, of which only three can be experienced in a single performance, and more than 90 different rooms in which the action takes place, SNM is a social experience because it needs to be; because the performance cannot make sense without the offered experiences of other people. The story is necessarily incomplete without the pieces that other people can share.’

via Rethinking why immersive theatre is compelling. It might not be the immersion after all. | museum geek.

‘You have to seek things out’

‘The element of choice also allows for a variety of experiences. The artist mentions that “Two people who go to one of our events can go home and they’ll both have a very different experience. One of them could go ‘Did you see that room with the piano and the glitter cannons?’ In response someone else could go ‘What are you talking about? I was in a cab ride with a horse!’ It’s not about passively sitting there as an audience sitting there and watching what is being presented for us.

“You have to seek things out if you want to and depending on the time, where you are and how much you seek, you’re experience will be completely different to everyone else.”’

Source: The immersive theatre of The Boon Companions on anonymity, costumes and dancing. – Arts on the AU