Bring Out Your Dead

Last year, I ran a little itch.io jam called Bring Out Your Dead, for which people could submit unfinished projects and weird concept experiments. And I started doing some write-ups at the time of the pieces that caught my attention, but in some kind of meta keeping with the jam, I didn’t finish and publish […]

via A few more corpses from BOYD — Emily Short’s Interactive Storytelling

Absolutely love this ‘Bring Out Your Dead’ idea – to have a showing/airing of works that aren’t finished (and will possibly never be finished). Maybe it allows you to see what is worth hanging on to. Or lets you put it to rest. Or at least celebrate that you were trying something even if it was never going to work.

This was the overview from the event (which expresses the above so much more elegantly and precisely):

Bring Out Your Dead is an event for sharing dead WIPs and experiments that you don’t expect to finish, but that you’d like to show to someone anyway. It’s a chance to cleanse your hard drive, move on from old ideas, and salvage some learning from things that didn’t work out. It’s also an opportunity for your community to learn from your mistakes — which can be just as useful as learning from a success. Ambitious follies, bizarre experiments, toys, and notions that in retrospect never had a chance — all are welcome.

You are also welcome, and indeed encouraged, to provide some context about your work. What were you trying to achieve? What do you think is most or least successful about what you did? Why did you ultimately decide to abandon the project? Are there things you think others could learn from the project?

There is no ranking in this jam: it’s not about competition and judgments. However, discussion is welcome, especially if you find something in someone’s entry that sparks your imagination.

via https://itch.io/jam/bring-out-your-dead

This would work so well in the context of performance-making. I’m going to do it. I’m going to book a space for a day or weekend and put out the call. Emily Short, I hope you don’t mind? #watchthisspace

 

Flight

This is extraordinary. But, beware, because it’s also full of big, sad feels. Which, if you’re empathetic, you might enjoy…

I’m not sure about that idea of pleasure in/from the sadness. I’m not sure that ‘it exists at a safe distance’. But it is beautiful.