The ‘social contract of the theatre seat’

‘What happens when you remove the typical social contract of the theatre seat? We invited the audience to walk in our oppressive world and they wanted to change it. The audience’s acts of touching and speaking, grabbing and yelling were both revelatory and deeply disturbing. Were they assholes or heroes?’

via Immersion, Coercion, and Mutiny: How do we set rules for the audience? | HowlRound.

Necessarily incomplete

‘I’m beginning to suspect that the reason SNM is so successful may be less that the experience is immersive but the fact that it is complex, compelling, and difficult to understand or complete alone. With 17 hours of content, of which only three can be experienced in a single performance, and more than 90 different rooms in which the action takes place, SNM is a social experience because it needs to be; because the performance cannot make sense without the offered experiences of other people. The story is necessarily incomplete without the pieces that other people can share.’

via Rethinking why immersive theatre is compelling. It might not be the immersion after all. | museum geek.

Unstoppability

‘Given that most participants begin the experience before other audience members have exited, there is a certain unstoppability to the entire undertaking once the first audience members meet the first performer. Where can we hide flexible, connective, and responsive tissue in this piece? How do we park someone, or rush someone, without them ever knowing we are doing it?’

via Creating and Managing a Deep Structure and a Responsive Surface | HowlRound.

Follow the link to a detailed, useful insight into immersive theatre/experience making.

1:Many

This morning I was reading the No Pro post about the opening weekend of the 2015 Without Walls festival (WoW) and was taken-aback to encounter notes about a solo immersive work.

‘This is what open-frame solo shows should be like.’

via A Weekend to be WOWed.

The production was The Bitter Game by Keith Wallace:

‘The Bitter Game blends verse, prose and “shit-talkin,'” into a stirring commentary that begs the question, what does it mean to survive while Black in America? This solo work, ripe with pain, poetry and laughter, examines the relationship between a young man and his mother as each struggles to protect one another from that which seems inevitable. The Bitter Game explores the subtle and often unrecognized effects of racism, the question of police agency, and the value of Black lives in this country.’

via La Jolla Playhouse.

Why was I taken-aback by this? Because I hadn’t realised that, even though I’ve resisted adopting any firm definition of what immersive theatre is or could be, and even though I’ve very recently been reading about festivals and events that include multiple interactive (and potentially immersive) performances I had nonetheless adopted a default picture of immersive theatre in my mind. That picture always, I now realise, included multiple performers. Reading about events that included multiple 1:1 type performances such as Domicile hadn’t triggered the realisation because, I think, I was still reading it as involving groups of, rather than solo, performers. The description of The Bitter Game bumped right up against that, particularly because of the 1:Many performance to audience relationship it involved. So useful to be reminded that, as much as you try to avoid it, it’s very easy for your thinking (even subconsciously) to slip towards the creation of lazy models rather than thinking about each specific instance as an individual instance.

It’s also really useful because it highlights that it is possible to create a successful immersive work without needing a cast of thousands.

‘what they see and what they skip’

“In an immersive theatre production, the audience in some way plays a role, whether that is the role of witness or the role of an actual character. They may be allowed to roam and explore the performance space as the performance happens around them, allowing them to decide what they see and what they skip.”

via The Space » What is Immersive Theatre?.

This description highlights, for me, one of the central tensions that exists between the way we often talk about immersive theatre and the way it is actually experienced. In many cases (possibly most cases) an audience member does not decide “what they see or what they skip” because they do not  have access to sufficient information to be able to make that choice. Certainly this is the case for many first-time visitors to an immersive theatre production such as Sleep No More. In other cases an audience member may have the information about the full range of choices but lack the ability or opportunity to access them for reasons that are outside of their control.

what is a ‘research warrant’? #knowhow

patter

The notion of a warrant is important in research. It helps to know what the term means, particularly if you get asked a question about your research warrant in, say, a conference presentation or supervision tutorial.

Most dictionaries define a warrant as a justification for an action, belief or feeling. If an action is warranted then there is a sound rationale, cause or basis for it. An action that is warranted is one which has good grounds.

But how is this relevant to research?

At the end of a piece of research we want to be able to say what we “found” – but we have to make claims that are justified. In other words, for the research to be trustworthy, it has to be both defensible in both ‘process and product’. A ‘research warrant’ thus refers to the ways in which our data supports the claims that we make…

View original post 255 more words