‘“Yes” and “No” are Less Certain than You Think…’

Beautiful in fiction.

‘You can use the same words to mean different things. This ambiguity adds layers to otherwise simple dialogue.

It creates a depth, with varying degrees of uncertainty – which creates a kind of tension that draws the reader’s attention.

Here’s a passage from For Whom the Bell Tolls

“How many people have you ever loved?”

“Nobody.”

“Not even me?”

“Yes, you.”

“How many others really?”

“None.”

“How many have you—how do you say it?—stayed with?”

“None.”

“You’re lying to me.”

“Yes.”

Maria’s (the first speaker’s) feelings are obvious by her questions, but Robert’s feelings…Does he actually love her? How much? Is he lying? Are these lies for good, or for ill?’

Source: Hemingway’s 7 Tricks to Immersive Dialogue | P. S. Hoffman

Quote

Open not shut

“The kind of questioning you do in order to develop your ideas should open up possibilities, rather than shutting them down.” 

(from “Writing Your Dissertation in Fifteen Minutes a Day: A Guide to Starting, Revising, and Finishing Your Doctoral Thesis” by Joan Bolker)
Link to free preview of book: http://a.co/fCQUFwR

Bring Out Your Dead

Last year, I ran a little itch.io jam called Bring Out Your Dead, for which people could submit unfinished projects and weird concept experiments. And I started doing some write-ups at the time of the pieces that caught my attention, but in some kind of meta keeping with the jam, I didn’t finish and publish […]

via A few more corpses from BOYD — Emily Short’s Interactive Storytelling

Absolutely love this ‘Bring Out Your Dead’ idea – to have a showing/airing of works that aren’t finished (and will possibly never be finished). Maybe it allows you to see what is worth hanging on to. Or lets you put it to rest. Or at least celebrate that you were trying something even if it was never going to work. Continue reading

Link

Story Shuffle

Keen to try this out but just realised, following move, am a bit more isolated in terms of other writing friends than I used to be. I took you for granted co-located writing buddies … I’m sorry….

On the other hand, maybe this is motivation to organise a day or weekend of writing events to make new writing friends…

“Story Shuffle: A Collaborative Writing Exercise

Participants in this exercise will use index cards to generate short prose fragments. Once collected together and shuffled, the fragments form a single work of collaborative fiction which, though no doubt peculiar in structure and varied in tone, will present surprising and exciting arrangements of setting, character, points of view, and plot.”

Source: Writing Resources | Jedediah Berry

Aside

‘Somehow we don’t feel the same way about someone on stage: Performers are usually rewarded for their bravery, applauded for making themselves vulnerable. Bloggers, on the other hand, are seemingly hobbyists and amateurs, even if they’re getting paid for their work.’

via The 80/20 Rule — Matter — Medium.

It’s an interesting suggestion, that many (most?) don’t see blogging as performance, or that, if they/we/I do that they/we/I have different criteria for what makes a good performance/performer.

(I’m not sure what’s going on with the they/we/I here … I’m uncomfortable with continuing the generalised ‘we’ of the quote I think. Who is this ‘we’?)

The stage

Quote

‘this is just where we keep the chairs’

‘Come in, come in and take a seat, but please don’t wait for the show to start.

It has already started.

You probably thought it would begin once an audience had assembled, we apologize for any confusion.

The show began before you arrived and it will continue after you leave.

(It may follow you like a puppy or a lingering dream.)

You don’t have to stay here, this is just where we keep the chairs and you can take your chair with you, if you are attached to it, or you may choose another.’

via flax-golden tales: take a seat | erin morgenstern.